Brazil: In the Jungle, the Mighty Jungle

Brazil Travel post #10: The Mighty Jungle (intro post is here).

So now that I’ve officially exhausted jungle-themed songs as titles, let’s actually go into the jungle.

A great place to…reflect. Heh.

Each day, we had 2-3 excursions from the main boat. Morning, afternoon, and night. Some of those days included jungle hikes into the pure, unadulterated wild. This wasn’t like those jungle hikes in Rio, where the trail is wide and flat from thousands of tourists. From what the owner of the Tucano told us, the areas we went in only we went in. Judging by the machete-clearing techniques used by our guides, I believed it.

Our guide, Edgivan, teaching us about jungle fruits.

The main problem, however, was footwear. We didn’t bring hiking boots, we brought hiking sandals. Which wouldn’t really be a problem except for the fact that we could sink into six inches of dead leaves and other rotten vegetation with each step (where, of course, spiders, scorpions, and vipers love to hide).

Good luck little toeseys.

So…that part was unnerving. The hikes themselves, however, were extraordinary.

The “skeleton” of a leaf after its “flesh” has been eaten.

While the Amazon jungle has the greatest diversity of life in the world, it actually has low density of each kind. So each type of animal you come across should be treated like an unexpected gift.

A gift that comes easier when you have an amazing camera zoom! (Photo by Jerry Peek)

Here, you’ll see the “greatest hits” of our jungle hike excursions.

This moth has about a foot-wide wingspan!
Wasps love mangoes.
Bullet ants, very painful and very big. About the length of my forefinger.

Story time: Bullet ants (pictured above) are known to have one of the most painful stings of any ant. In fact, apparently, it feels like you’ve just been stung (with fresh pain) for about 24 hours. It’s so bad, that there’s a tribe whose “manhood ritual” involves wearing a glove filled with bullet ants. Once a boy does this, he is now a man, and can accomplish anything.

Occasionally it does rain in the rainforest…who knew?
Even the trees around us were exotic.
Learning. (photo by Jerry Peek)
Edgi showing us a rubber tree.
Pure rubber! (photo by Jerry Peek)
Life under every leaf.
“Ruins” of a rubber labor camp.

Story time: The site pictured above was run as a “company store” and the natives that worked here were essentially tricked into indentured servitude. Those that tried to speak out were never heard from again…. Despite all the natural beauty here, it’s important to keep in mind the history (and current activities) of exploiting the rainforest. It’s a fragile ecosystem, despite its size.

So many butterfly varietals, I dont think I saw the same one twice. (photo by Jerry Peek)
Tiger butterfly? Im not sure. And, there are so many species, that not all are named. (photo by Jerry Peek)
Yes, he is actually trying to get ants on his hand.

Story time: Souza showed us this specific type of ant (which frenzies in response to noise) that doesn’t sting, but their body fluids make for a great natural mosquito repellent. All you have to do is clap nearby to get them to rush out of their nest, then you let them on your hand, and rub them onto your skin.

And, incredibly, it worked!
So we both tried it!
“What’s up?”
A baby sloth, that’s what!
Souza “spider charming.”

Story time: The protagonist in this story is our guide, Souza. The antagonist a giant bird-eating tarantula. Here’s the setup. Souza is a self-proclaimed “Coboclo” (a person of mixed ancestry where half is a native) and grew up in the jungle. So he knows his stuff. He knows hundreds of bird calls. Can identify dozens of types of ant nests. Hundreds of plant types, along with their uses. And…he knows how to “charm” giant spiders out of their burrows.

Here it comes…

He put his scent (sweat and spit) on a stick, the tricked the spider into defending its burrow against said stick. When the first spider came out, there was a collective gasp from the group.

Collective gasp! This sucker is as big as my hand and probably three times as large as any “pet shop” tarantula I have ever seen.

Though we had some adventure and excitement, mostly what we found was natural beauty and new experiences.

And lots of colors!
We had a brief stop to see some villagers, but they had left on a holiday soccer trip. (photo by Jerry Peek)

Seeing the jungle “up close and personal” was definitely worth it. And no bites or stings! Next time I’ll show you all the things we could see from our expeditionary watercraft. Hint: A lot more animals!

PS — I’m taking the weekend off. Michaela’s mom is in town, and I’m meeting up with a friend from out of town for some quality dude time. Catch you on Monday!

Click to continue: Brazil: Rollin’ on the River.


Thanks for reading! What do YOU think? Is that sloth the cutest or what?

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A charity that’s no monkey business

Author’s note: From time to time, I have promotions on twitter.  When @Weaverwerx became my 300th follower, I offered a prize.  Highlighting this charity was his request, which I am pleased to honor.

Jungle Friends Primate Sanctuary is a  501(c)3 non-profit organization, located on 12 acres in Gainesville, Florida.  Their mission is to rescue and offer a permanent, safe haven for monkeys from around the United States who have been abused, confiscated by authorities, retired from research, or who are ex-pets.

In a way, this issue strikes me on a personal level.  I lived in Great Falls, Montana for a number of years.  There was this little pet shop downtown with a glass facade where the same captive monkey would look out at passers by with a blank stare.  Among my friends, we lamentably called him “the saddest monkey in the world”.  Mostly, the monkey was kept in the back and the few visitors who happened by could clearly see the poor little guy had lost his mind.

monkey behind glass
Such is the life of a captive monkey.

Fortunately, Montana no longer allows the sale of monkeys for pets.  However, that pet store still has a supply of monkeys “for out of state buyers.”  If Jungle Friends aims to end such cruelty, this is a mission I can fully support.  From their website:

Jungle Friends discourages the keeping of primates as ‘pets’ and we hope the practice of stealing baby monkeys from their natural mothers will end. Baby monkeys are literally pulled from their protective mothers, sometimes when they are only three days old, to be sold as ‘pets’. It is not hard to imagine the horror both baby and mother monkey must feel during this traumatic and forced separation. Sadly, it can take a lifetime for the grief-stricken mother to come out of a depression brought on by this thievery and there are always scars left on mother and baby from such cruelty.