The Gamebook Revolution

Interactive Fiction and Gamebooks are becoming increasingly popular every day. The artform peaked and declined in the 80s and 90s, but now more and more authors are emerging who use this as a preferred storytelling medium, rather than as a gimmick. I’d argue we’re at the cusp of a new golden age for branching path narratives.

One such emerging author is Greg Hickey, who recently reached out to me as part of an article he was writing with a central question: Why do interactive fiction writers do what we do? What makes juggling multiple storylines worth the extra effort? He interviewed several such authors, including some bestsellers, and I was happy to add my $0.02. Here’s what I had to say:

Click Your Poison books are, at their core, a form of collaborative storytelling. By letting the reader choose brazen action or reserved caution, for example, you get to create your own story world unlike any traditional novel. My books are meant to be re-read over and over again, with clues gained from earlier reads informing future decisions. This peel-back-the-layers approach of interactive storytelling allows for a unique experience only available to gamebooks. The immediacy of playing the role of protagonist changes the dynamic from shouting at a character, “Don’t go in the house!” to wondering, “Should I go in the house? Are the rewards worth the risk?”

-Author James Schannep

Greg has completed his article and compiled a list, which includes answers from the other authors he interviewed. I’m pleased to be able to share their wisdom with you here:

You can also read Greg’s article over on his site: 10 Contemporary Interactive Books for Adults.

Introducing, “Friends of CYP.”

Additionally, I’ve added a new section on my website. Think of this as an “other books you may like” section for the interactive fiction genre. Check out the Friends of CYP page now.

Are you an author or publisher interested in becoming a friend? Send me a message on my contact page.


What do YOU think?  As a reader (or writer) of branching path narratives, I’d love to hear your thoughts. Leave a comment below to join in the conversation.

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